Wood: History and Uses

Wood: History and Uses

Wood is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants. It is an organic material – a natural composite of cellulose fibers that are strong in tension and embedded in a matrix of lignin that resists compression. Wood is sometimes defined as only the secondary xylem in the stems of trees, or it is defined more broadly to include the same type of tissue elsewhere such as in the roots of trees or shrubs.[citation needed] In a living tree it performs a support function, enabling woody plants to grow large or to stand up by themselves. It also conveys water and nutrients between the leaves, other growing tissues, and the roots. Wood may also refer to other plant materials with comparable properties, and to material engineered from wood, or wood chips or fiber.

Wood has been used for thousands of years for fuel, as a construction material, for making tools and weapons, furniture and paper. More recently it emerged as a feedstock for the production of purified cellulose and its derivatives, such as cellophane and cellulose acetate.

As of 2005, the growing stock of forests worldwide was about 434 billion cubic meters, 47% of which was commercial. As an abundant, carbon-neutral renewable resource, woody materials have been of intense interest as a source of renewable energy. In 1991 approximately 3.5 billion cubic meters of wood were harvested. Dominant uses were for furniture and building construction.

History

A 2011 discovery in the Canadian province of New Brunswick yielded the earliest known plants to have grown wood, approximately 395 to 400 million years ago.

Wood can be dated by carbon dating and in some species by dendrochronology to determine when a wooden object was created.

People have used wood for thousands of years for many purposes, including as a fuel or as a construction material for making houses, tools, weapons, furniture, packaging, artworks, and paper. Known constructions using wood date back ten thousand years. Buildings like the European Neolithic long house were made primarily of wood.

Recent use of wood has been enhanced by the addition of steel and bronze into construction.

The year-to-year variation in tree-ring widths and isotopic abundances gives clues to the prevailing climate at the time a tree was cut.

Physical properties

Uses

Fuel
Main article: Wood fuel
Wood has a long history of being used as fuel, which continues to this day, mostly in rural areas of the world. Hardwood is preferred over softwood because it creates less smoke and burns longer. Adding a woodstove or fireplace to a home is often felt to add ambiance and warmth.

Construction

The Saitta House, Dyker Heights, Brooklyn, New York built in 1899 is made of and decorated in wood.
Wood has been an important construction material since humans began building shelters, houses and boats. Nearly all boats were made out of wood until the late 19th century, and wood remains in common use today in boat construction. Elm in particular was used for this purpose as it resisted decay as long as it was kept wet (it also served for water pipe before the advent of more modern plumbing).

Wood to be used for construction work is commonly known as lumber in North America. Elsewhere, lumber usually refers to felled trees, and the word for sawn planks ready for use is timber. In Medieval Europe oak was the wood of choice for all wood construction, including beams, walls, doors, and floors. Today a wider variety of woods is used: solid wood doors are often made from poplar, small-knotted pine, and Douglas fir.

The churches of Kizhi, Russia are among a handful of World Heritage Sites built entirely of wood, without metal joints. See Kizhi Pogost for more details.
New domestic housing in many parts of the world today is commonly made from timber-framed construction. Engineered wood products are becoming a bigger part of the construction industry. They may be used in both residential and commercial buildings as structural and aesthetic materials.

In buildings made of other materials, wood will still be found as a supporting material, especially in roof construction, in interior doors and their frames, and as exterior cladding.

Wood is also commonly used as shuttering material to form the mold into which concrete is poured during reinforced concrete construction.

Flooring

Wood can be cut into straight planks and made into a wood flooring.
Main article: Wood flooring
A solid wood floor is a floor laid with planks or battens created from a single piece of timber, usually a hardwood. Since wood is hydroscopic (it acquires and loses moisture from the ambient conditions around it) this potential instability effectively limits the length and width of the boards.

Solid hardwood flooring is usually cheaper than engineered timbers and damaged areas can be sanded down and refinished repeatedly, the number of times being limited only by the thickness of wood above the tongue.

Solid hardwood floors were originally used for structural purposes, being installed perpendicular to the wooden support beams of a building (the joists or bearers) and solid construction timber is still often used for sports floors as well as most traditional wood blocks, mosaics and parquetry.

Engineered products
Main article: Engineered wood
Engineered wood products, glued building products “engineered” for application-specific performance requirements, are often used in construction and industrial applications. Glued engineered wood products are manufactured by bonding together wood strands, veneers, lumber or other forms of wood fiber with glue to form a larger, more efficient composite structural unit.

These products include glued laminated timber (glulam), wood structural panels (including plywood, oriented strand board and composite panels), laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and other structural composite lumber (SCL) products, parallel strand lumber, and I-joists. Approximately 100 million cubic meters of wood was consumed for this purpose in 1991.

The trends suggest that particle board and fiber board will overtake plywood.

Wood unsuitable for construction in its native form may be broken down mechanically (into fibers or chips) or chemically (into cellulose) and used as a raw material for other building materials, such as engineered wood, as well as chipboard, hardboard, and medium-density fiberboard (MDF). Such wood derivatives are widely used: wood fibers are an important component of most paper, and cellulose is used as a component of some synthetic materials. Wood derivatives can be used for kinds of flooring, for example laminate flooring.

Furniture and utensils
Wood has always been used extensively for furniture, such as chairs and beds. It is also used for tool handles and cutlery, such as chopsticks, toothpicks, and other utensils, like the wooden spoon and pencil.

Other
Further developments include new lignin glue applications, recyclable food packaging, rubber tire replacement applications, anti-bacterial medical agents, and high strength fabrics or composites.[33] As scientists and engineers further learn and develop new techniques to extract various components from wood, or alternatively to modify wood, for example by adding components to wood, new more advanced products will appear on the marketplace. Moisture content electronic monitoring can also enhance next generation wood protection.

Art

Prayer Bead with the Adoration of the Magi and the Crucifixion, Gothic boxwood miniature
Wood has long been used as an artistic medium. It has been used to make sculptures and carvings for millennia. Examples include the totem poles carved by North American indigenous people from conifer trunks, often Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata).

Other uses of wood in the arts include:

Woodcut printmaking and engraving
Wood can be a surface to paint on, such as in panel painting
Many musical instruments are made mostly or entirely of wood

40 Comments

  1. Reply

    Good

  2. Reply

    Interesting update

  3. Reply

    Wow

  4. Profile photo ofSIRMUSTY

    Reply

    nice article

  5. Reply

    Nice write up

  6. Reply

    This is a very nice and educative. Thanks for educating us.

  7. Reply

    Wood are very important, students make very use of plywood for project drawing

  8. Reply

    Wood has a lot of uses in our everyday life

  9. Reply

    very good

  10. Reply

    Thank you so much for the teaching

  11. Reply

    Wood as been of help to man

  12. Reply

    Very nice article

  13. Reply

    Wood are off very important, nice article

  14. Reply

    This is nice

  15. Profile photo ofKreator

    Reply

    Nice piece

  16. Reply

    Wow

  17. Reply

    Good write up

  18. Reply

    nice

  19. Reply

    I think this is one of the best i have seen so far

  20. Reply

    Nice

  21. Reply

    Nice

  22. Reply

    Good one

  23. Reply

    Nice

  24. Reply

    I love this piece

  25. Reply

    Nice

  26. Reply

    Wood is very important

  27. Reply

    I always loved wood right from the day we started it in class…wood is very important and beautiful…there re many beautiful hotels outside the country made of wood

  28. Reply

    Wonderful update

  29. Reply

    Ironic how I stumbled upon this post when it’s part of a course I’m studying in school.
    This is really informative. Thank you

  30. Reply

    Good information. Interesting and practical guide

  31. Reply

    Nice info

  32. Reply

    Good

  33. Reply

    Wow…I thank God for creations

  34. Reply

    Nice

  35. Reply

    Which other wood are u guys talking about? The same for cooking right?

  36. Reply

    Wood get history? We met it on earth ni

  37. Reply

    Thanks for sharing

  38. Reply

    A very nice post
    This article is really amazing

  39. Reply

    This is really awesome

  40. Reply

    Amazing article

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