What Is Psoriasis?

What Is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disorder that causes healthy skin cells to turn over at an abnormally fast rate, leading to cell buildup and flaking cells on the outermost layer of the skin that are seen as rashes or lesions. They can appear on virtually any part of the body.
The most common type is plaque psoriasis, but there are several others that cause lesions that are different from the patches of scales that are most familiar. Usually, psoriasis is easily diagnosed with a medical history and physical exam.
Psoriasis affects more than 6 million people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It’s a chronic condition and can’t be cured, but there are many effective ways to
manage the symptoms , from simple measures like keeping skin moisturized to topical and oral medications and light therapy.
Nail psoriasis is plaque psoriasis that affects the fingernails and toenails. Approximately 80 to 90 percent of people with plaque psoriasis have nail involvement, causing symptoms such as pitting, crumbling, salmon-colored areas called oil-drop patches, and more, depending on what part of the nail is affected.
Inverse psoriasis (intertriginous psoriasis) occurs in skin folds such as the armpits, beneath the breasts, and between the buttocks. Lesions are red and smooth rather than dry and scaly.
Guttate psoriasis usually is triggered by a viral or bacterial infection such as strep. It’s characterized by pink teardrop-shaped bumps and is more common in children and people under age 30.
Pustular psoriasis produces lesions filled with non-contagious fluid made up of lymph fluid and white blood cells. Often, it’s confined to small areas of the body, but there is a rare and very serious form of the condition called von Zumbusch psoriasis that affects larger areas of the body and is characterized by pus-filled blisters and red skin. Other symptoms include fever, chills, dehydration, and increased heart rate. People with von Zumbusch psoriasis often must be hospitalized as the condition can be fatal if not treated properly.
Erythrodermic psoriasis occurs when the entire body turns bright red and scaly. In this instance, a skin biopsy may be needed to distinguish erythrodermic psoriasis from other diseases.
Coping
Psoriasis can affect every aspect of a person’s daily life. It can be embarrassing, interfere with daily life, and simply be a nuisance. Coping with psoriasis, then, involves tending to how symptoms impact you both physically and mentally.
Among others, strategies include dealing with cold temperatures and dry air that can trigger or exacerbate the condition; finding ways to cover up or camouflage skin lesions, if they are bothersome to you; and taking measures to get adequate sleep, since the discomfort of psoriasis often interferes with quality shut-eye.
It’s important to know that people who deal with psoriasis are at an increased risk of depression and anxiety, as the condition can take a toll on a person’s self-image, sex life, and more. Seeking support from a support group or therapist can be helpful.
If you’ve just been diagnosed with psoriasis, you’re likely feeling overwhelmed with the realities of your condition. It may be helpful to remember that although the condition isn’t fully understood, it has been widely studied, resulting in a wealth of ways to successfully deal with it. If one treatment doesn’t adequately control your symptoms, go back to your doctor, ask questions, and try something new. It may take trial-and-error, but you will be able to find a combination of treatments and coping strategies that will allow you to control your psoriasis and not the other way around.
If you’ve just been diagnosed with psoriasis, you’re likely feeling overwhelmed with the realities of your condition. It may be helpful to remember that although the condition isn’t fully understood, it has been widely studied, resulting in a wealth of ways to successfully deal with it. If one treatment doesn’t adequately control your symptoms, go back to your doctor, ask questions, and try something new. It may take trial-and-error, but you will be able to find a combination of treatments and coping strategies that will allow you to control your psoriasis and not the other way around.
If you’ve just been diagnosed with psoriasis, you’re likely feeling overwhelmed with the realities of your condition. It may be helpful to remember that although the condition isn’t fully understood, it has been widely studied, resulting in a wealth of ways to successfully deal with it. If one treatment doesn’t adequately control your symptoms, go back to your doctor, ask questions, and try something new. It may take trial-and-error, but you will be able to find a combination of treatments and coping strategies that will allow you to control your psoriasis and not the other way around.

14 Comments

  1. Reply

    See dem

  2. Reply

    Good

  3. Reply

    Ok na

  4. Reply

    Good to know

  5. Reply

    Knowledgeable

  6. Reply

    Thanks for the update

  7. Reply

    Nml

  8. Reply

    This is really good and interesting to know

  9. Profile photo ofKreator

    Reply

    Nice article

  10. Reply

    Thanks

  11. Reply

    Amazing

  12. Reply

    Good to know

  13. Profile photo ofSIRMUSTY

    Reply

    never heard

  14. Reply

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disorder that causes healthy skin cells to turn over at an abnormally fast rate, leading to cell buildup and flaking cells on the outermost layer of the skin that are seen as rashes or lesions. They can appear on virtually any part of the body.

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