What Is Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer?

What Is Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer?

Treatment options have expanded greatly in recent years, and include surgery, targeted therapies, immunotherapy, chemotherapy, and radiation. Everyone who has been diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer should have molecular profiling done to see if their tumor carries genetic changes that can be treated.

It’s important to note that even though an advanced non-small cell lung cancer is inoperable, it is still treatable. There have been many recent advances in the treatment of lung cancer, and survival rates are improving for all stages of the disease.1

Let’s look at all of these areas in greater depth, as well as how you can best cope if you’ve been diagnosed. Since lung cancer affects not just individuals, but families, we will also look at what you may wish to know if your loved one has non-small cell lung cancer.

Types of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Verywell / Emily Roberts
Types of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
There are three primary types of non-small cell lung cancer. These include:

Adenocarcinoma
Adenocarcinoma is the most common form of non-small cell lung cancer accounting for approximately 40 percent of cases in the United States.2 It occurs mainly in current or former smokers, but it is also found in young adults, women, and people who have never smoked. Lung adenocarcinoma usually begins in the outer regions of the lungs and can grow quite large before it is detected. Since these tumors are usually located away from the airways, commonly recognized symptoms such as coughing are less common. Early symptoms are often subtle, with shortness of breath with activity, and a general sense of ill health.
Treatment options have expanded greatly in recent years, and include surgery, targeted therapies, immunotherapy, chemotherapy, and radiation. Everyone who has been diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer should have molecular profiling done to see if their tumor carries genetic changes that can be treated.

It’s important to note that even though an advanced non-small cell lung cancer is inoperable, it is still treatable. There have been many recent advances in the treatment of lung cancer, and survival rates are improving for all stages of the disease.1

Let’s look at all of these areas in greater depth, as well as how you can best cope if you’ve been diagnosed. Since lung cancer affects not just individuals, but families, we will also look at what you may wish to know if your loved one has non-small cell lung cancer.

Types of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Verywell / Emily Roberts
Types of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
There are three primary types of non-small cell lung cancer. These include:

Adenocarcinoma
Adenocarcinoma is the most common form of non-small cell lung cancer accounting for approximately 40 percent of cases in the United States.2 It occurs mainly in current or former smokers, but it is also found in young adults, women, and people who have never smoked. Lung adenocarcinoma usually begins in the outer regions of the lungs and can grow quite large before it is detected. Since these tumors are usually located away from the airways, commonly recognized symptoms such as coughing are less common. Early symptoms are often subtle, with shortness of breath with activity, and a general sense of ill health.
Coping
If you are newly diagnosed with lung cancer, you are probably feeling frightened and overwhelmed. Check out these tips on the first steps to take after a lung cancer diagnosis.

Research suggests that learning as much as you can about your cancer may help you better follow treatment plans, and may even help with outcomes.9 Take a moment to learn about how to find good cancer information online. Becoming connected with the community also has many benefits, as you can connect with others facing a similar situation, and also see what they have learned along the way.

26 Comments

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  18. Profile photo ofKreator

    Reply

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  23. Profile photo ofSIRMUSTY

    Reply

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  24. Reply

    Everyone who has been diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer should have molecular profiling done to see if their tumor carries genetic changes that can be treated.

  25. Reply

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