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What Is Measles?

Measles is a type of paramyxovirus
that’s highly contagious, causing symptoms like red eyes, fever, sore throat, and a cough, followed by a rash that starts on the face several days later. Health experts hope to one day eradicate measles just as
smallpox has been wiped out, but unfortunately, measles is still a big concern worldwide. In fact, the virus that causes measles is one of the leading causes of vaccine-preventable death in children under age five worldwide and outbreaks still occur—even in the United States.
Verywell / Emily Roberts
Measles Symptoms
Because measles is relatively uncommon in the United States, people, including doctors, aren’t always quick to recognize the signs and symptoms. Signs and symptoms of measles usually begin about 7 to 14 days after exposure to someone who is infected, and include:
A child with a typical measles rash on their face. Yasser Chalid / Getty Images
People do still die from measles and its complications, though the numbers have, of course, been drastically reduced since the invention of the vaccine, especially in the United States. Since 2000, there have been one to two deaths per every 1000 cases of measles. The number of annual measles cases in the country since then has ranged from 37 to 667. That said, there have been measles deaths anywhere there has been a measles outbreak, including in industrialized countries such as the United Kingdom, Japan, Canada, France, and the Netherlands. In 2016, nearly 246 people died per day from measles worldwide.
Symptoms of Measles
Causes
Measles is caused by an extremely contagious virus that lives in the throat and nose. If you’re infected, other people can get sick when you cough, sneeze, or even talk because you’re spraying tiny, infected droplets that can live for up to two hours both in the air or on a surface. The virus enters your mucous membranes and respiratory tract, spreading to the lymph nodes, bloodstream, and organs like the kidneys, liver, and skin.
Not being vaccinated against measles (either fully or at all) puts you at great risk with exposure.
Measles is a type of paramyxovirus
that’s highly contagious, causing symptoms like red eyes, fever, sore throat, and a cough, followed by a rash that starts on the face several days later. Health experts hope to one day eradicate measles just as
smallpox has been wiped out, but unfortunately, measles is still a big concern worldwide. In fact, the virus that causes measles is one of the leading causes of vaccine-preventable death in children under age five worldwide and outbreaks still occur—even in the United States.
Verywell / Emily Roberts
Measles Symptoms
Because measles is relatively uncommon in the United States, people, including doctors, aren’t always quick to recognize the signs and symptoms. Signs and symptoms of measles usually begin about 7 to 14 days after exposure to someone who is infected, and include:
A child with a typical measles rash on their face. Yasser Chalid / Getty Images
People do still die from measles and its complications, though the numbers have, of course, been drastically reduced since the invention of the vaccine, especially in the United States. Since 2000, there have been one to two deaths per every 1000 cases of measles. The number of annual measles cases in the country since then has ranged from 37 to 667. That said, there have been measles deaths anywhere there has been a measles outbreak, including in industrialized countries such as the United Kingdom, Japan, Canada, France, and the Netherlands. In 2016, nearly 246 people died per day from measles worldwide.
Symptoms of Measles
Causes
Measles is caused by an extremely contagious virus that lives in the throat and nose. If you’re infected, other people can get sick when you cough, sneeze, or even talk because you’re spraying tiny, infected droplets that can live for up to two hours both in the air or on a surface. The virus enters your mucous membranes and respiratory tract, spreading to the lymph nodes, bloodstream, and organs like the kidneys, liver, and skin.
Not being vaccinated against measles (either fully or at all) puts you at great risk with exposure.

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10 Comments

  1. Reply

    Good

  2. Reply

    Very informative

  3. Reply

    This is very educative

  4. Reply

    Very educative

  5. Reply

    Very good one

  6. Profile photo ofKreator

    Reply

    Nice Piece

  7. Reply

    Thanks for the update

  8. Reply

    Nice info

  9. Reply

    Nice
    Thanks for sharing

  10. Reply

    Nice

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