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What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)?

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the colon (part of the large intestine). Symptoms include crampy abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and/or diarrhea. The causes aren’t well understood, and it is diagnosed based on its symptoms. People manage their IBS with diet and lifestyle modifications, and some medications are used as well. However, this is chronic condition that can be controlled, but not cured.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms
When it comes to IBS, there are a number of unpleasant intestinal issues. While the intensity and severity of symptoms vary from person to person, some of the most predominant symptoms include:

IBS does not lead to any organic disease, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, or any type of bowel cancer. It can, however, increase the likelihood of some mental health issues such as depression and anxiety.

Signs, Symptoms, and Complications of IBS
Causes
The causes of IBS are still unclear. It may be a combination of problems and brought on by different factors in each person.

As a functional gastrointestinal disorder, it appears to be due to problems in how the brain and gut interact. In a person with IBS, the muscles in the colon that move digested food along are exceptionally sensitive to certain stimuli or triggers. People with IBS may have a difference in gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, inflammation, and gut bacteria. Sometimes IBS develops after an infection in your digestive tract.

Twice as many women as men have IBS, and it seems to be triggered by hormones related to the menstrual cycle.

Although IBS technically is not caused by stress or strong emotions, some people have their first flare-up of IBS symptoms during a stressful period in their life, such as the death of a relative or loss of a job. These stressors aggravate the condition to the point where it becomes more noticeable or bothersome.

IBS tends to run in families, so a genetic predisposition may be at work. Researchers are looking into what genes might lead to an increased risk. This research may also give clues as to what processes in the body are disordered in IBS.

Foods do not cause IBS, but eating certain foods may set off symptoms of diarrhea, bloating, or pain. These “trigger foods” may be choices that are generally irritating, such as fried foods or alcohol, or specific food sensitivities.

IBS does not lead to any organic disease, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, or any type of bowel cancer. It can, however, increase the likelihood of some mental health issues such as depression and anxiety.

Signs, Symptoms, and Complications of IBS
Causes
The causes of IBS are still unclear. It may be a combination of problems and brought on by different factors in each person.

As a functional gastrointestinal disorder, it appears to be due to problems in how the brain and gut interact. In a person with IBS, the muscles in the colon that move digested food along are exceptionally sensitive to certain stimuli or triggers. People with IBS may have a difference in gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, inflammation, and gut bacteria. Sometimes IBS develops after an infection in your digestive tract.

Twice as many women as men have IBS, and it seems to be triggered by hormones related to the menstrual cycle.

Although IBS technically is not caused by stress or strong emotions, some people have their first flare-up of IBS symptoms during a stressful period in their life, such as the death of a relative or loss of a job. These stressors aggravate the condition to the point where it becomes more noticeable or bothersome.

IBS tends to run in families, so a genetic predisposition may be at work. Researchers are looking into what genes might lead to an increased risk. This research may also give clues as to what processes in the body are disordered in IBS.

Foods do not cause IBS, but eating certain foods may set off symptoms of diarrhea, bloating, or pain. These “trigger foods” may be choices that are generally irritating, such as fried foods or alcohol, or specific food sensitivities.

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34 Comments

  1. Reply

    I haven’t heard of this before

  2. Reply

    amazing

  3. Reply

    Thanks for sharing

  4. Profile photo ofSIRMUSTY

    Reply

    never heard of IBS

  5. Reply

    Amazing post

  6. Reply

    Nice

  7. Reply

    Wow

  8. Reply

    Seriously I haven’t had of this

  9. Reply

    Informative article. Thanks for sharing.

  10. Reply

    Cool

  11. Reply

    Awesome

  12. Reply

    So educating

  13. Reply

    Thanks

  14. Reply

    This is very informative

  15. Reply

    Very article

  16. Reply

    Good sharing

  17. Reply

    This is all new to me

  18. Reply

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome…

  19. Reply

    Just getting to know about this

  20. Reply

    Very informative…thanks for sharing

  21. Reply

    This is really good to know

  22. Reply

    Thanks for sharing

  23. Reply

    Thanks for sharing

  24. Reply

    Good

  25. Reply

    Amazing updates

  26. Reply

    This causes a really bad experience

  27. Profile photo ofKreator

    Reply

    Nice Piece

  28. Reply

    Very Educative

  29. Reply

    wonderful piece

  30. Reply

    Very impressive

  31. Reply

    Nice information

  32. Reply

    Nice to hear

  33. Reply

    Thanks for sharing this update

  34. Reply

    Good to know

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