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Netflix’s The Witcher: What The Symbols In The Opening Credits Mean

The opening credits of each episode of Netflix’s The Witcher have a different symbol, and they all connect to the story and characters.

 

BY ADRIENNE TYLER

7 HOURS AGO

 

Each episode of Netflix’s The Witcher has a different symbol in its opening credits, and they all have a meaning that connects to the story and characters. Based on the book series of the same name by Andrzej Sapkowski, The Witcher was released on Netflix in December 2019, making it the first English-language TV adaptation of the novels. The Witcher was one of the most anticipated releases of the year, and Netflix decided to renew it for a second season before the first one was out.

 

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The Witcher had a non-linear narrative, which was a bit confusing to some, as the series jumped from one point in time to another while following three characters. The protagonists of the series are Geralt of Rivia (Henry Cavill), an enhanced monster hunter; Yennefer of Vengerberg (Anya Chalotra), a powerful sorceress with a tragic backstory; and Ciri (Freya Allan), the crown princess of Cintra who has powers of her own. By the end of the season, the paths of these three characters converged, which was referenced in the opening credits of the final episode with a special symbol.

 

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To those familiar with the books and video games of The Witcher, the symbols in the opening credits of each episode are not a mystery, but to those whose first approach to this universe is Netflix’s series, it can be difficult to figure out what they mean – and here’s what each one represents.

 

Episode 1: “The End’s Beginning”

 

The first episode of Netflix’s The Witcher has a solar eclipse as symbol, referencing the Black Sun under which Renfri was born. Renfri was a princess, and was born after a prophesied eclipse known as the “Black Sun”. Renfri crosses paths with Geralt in this episode, and ends up being killed by him – but not before reminding him of his destiny and that “the girl in the woods” will always be with him.

 

Episode 2: “Four Marks”

 

Episode 2’s symbol is the obsidian star surrounded by eels, representing Yennefer and the other novitiates. Yennefer is introduced in this episode, where she’s sold to Tissaia and taken to Aretuza for training in magic. There she meets other students, of which some end up being turned into eels with the purpose of powering Aretuza with magic.

 

Episode 3: “Betrayer Moon”

 

The symbol of “Betrayer Moon” is a clawed footprint incorporating the Temerian lily, and it’s a reference to the striga Geralt fights in this episode. Geralt is taken to Temeria, where King Foltest is in need of his services as the town is being terrorized by a striga, which is actually Foltest’s daughter, Adda the White, who was cursed before she was even born.

 

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Episode 4: “Of Banquets, Bastards And Burials”

 

Episode 4 has a broken sword surrounded by a tree, which some fans believe to represent Queen Calanthe’s family tree. In this episode, viewers meet Ciri’s parents, Pavetta and Urcheon of Erlenwald (also named Duny), who demands her hand through the Law of Surprise, and she happily accepts. Geralt later invokes the Law of Surprise after helping Duny, and to his and everyone’s surprise, it’s revealed that Pavetta is pregnant with Duny’s child.

 

Episode 5: “Bottled Appetites”

 

“Bottle Appetites” has a female and male figure entwined, overlaying a stylized amphora. This peculiar symbol is all about Yennefer and Geralt, as this is the episode where they meet after Geralt and Jaskier have an unpleasant encounter with a djinn.

 

Episode 6: “Rare Species”

 

“Rare Species” has a dragon, as in this episode Geralt and Jaskier join a dragon hunt. As it turns out, Geralt is invited to the mission by the dragon himself, as he needs him to protect a dragon’s egg from the Reavers.

 

Episode 7: “Before A Fall”

 

The symbol of “Before a Fall” is a shattered lion, representing the fall of Cintra, as its coat of arms consists of three golden lions. In this episode, Nilfgaard begins its invasion of Cintra, sacking the city and breaching the castle.

 

Episode 8: “Much More”

 

The final episode of The Witcher season 1 is a combination of three symbols: Gwynbleidd (The White Wolf), Zireael (Swallow), and the obsidian star, representing Geralt, Ciri, and Yennefer, respectively. This is the episode where their paths converge, which is why the opening credits see all previous symbols merging to form this one.

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31 Comments

  1. Reply

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  3. Reply

    I love the movie tho, cant wait for the next episode

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  14. Reply

    Have watched this, it’s very interesting waiting for season 2

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