LITHIUM-ION BATTERY TECHNOLOGY

LITHIUM-ION BATTERY TECHNOLOGY

Lithium-ion batteries have also been in the news lately. That’s because these batteries have the ability to burst into flames occasionally. It’s not very common — just two or three battery packs per million have a problem — but when it happens, it’s extreme. In some situations, the failure rate can rise, and when that happens you end up with a worldwide battery recall that can cost manufacturers millions of dollars

A lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is an advanced battery technology that uses lithium ions as a key component of its electrochemistry. During a discharge cycle, lithium atoms in the anode are ionized and separated from their electrons. The lithium ions move from the anode and pass through the electrolyte until they reach the cathode, where they recombine with their electrons and electrically neutralize. The lithium ions are small enough to be able to move through a micro-permeable separator between the anode and cathode. In part because of lithium’s small size (third only to hydrogen and helium), Li-ion batteries are capable of having a very high voltage and charge storage per unit mass and unit volume.

Li-ion batteries can use a number of different materials as electrodes. The most common combination is that of lithium cobalt oxide (cathode) and graphite (anode), which is most commonly found in portable electronic devices such as cellphones and laptops. Other cathode materials include lithium manganese oxide (used in hybrid electric and electric automobiles) and lithium iron phosphate. Li-ion batteries typically use ether (a class of organic compounds) as an electrolyte.

ADVANTAGES OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERY AS A SOLAR STORAGE BATTERY

1. They’re generally much lighter than other types of rechargeable batteries of the same size. The electrodes of a lithium-ion battery are made of lightweight lithium and carbon. Lithium is also a highly reactive element, meaning that a lot of energy can be stored in its atomic bonds.

2. They hold their charge. A lithium-ion battery pack loses only about 5 percent of its charge per month, compared to a 20 percent loss per month for NiMH batteries.
3. Li-ion batteries have no memory effect, a detrimental process where repeated partial discharge/charge cycles can cause a battery to ‘remember’ a lower capacity.
4. They do not contain toxic cadmium, which makes it easier to dispose of than Ni-Cd batteries.
5. Lithium-ion batteries can handle hundreds of charge/discharge cycles.
6. Li-ion batteries are also used to power electrical systems for some aerospace applications, notable in the new and more environmentally friendly Boeing 787, where weight is a significant cost factor.

DISADVANTAGES OF LITHIUM-ION

1. Li-ion batteries have a tendency to overheat and can be damaged at high voltages. In some cases, this can lead to thermal runaway and combustion. This has caused significant problems, notably the grounding of the Boeing 787 fleet after onboard battery fires were reported
2. They start degrading as soon as they leave the factory. They will only last two or three years from the date of manufacture whether you use them or not.
3. They are extremely sensitive to high temperatures. Heat causes lithium-ion battery packs to degrade much faster than they normally would.
4. Li-ion batteries require safety mechanisms to limit voltage and internal pressures, which can increase weight and limit performance in some cases.
5. Another factor limiting their widespread adoption is their cost, which is around 40% higher than Ni-Cd. Addressing these issues is a key component for current research into the technology

20 Comments

  1. Reply

    GOOD

  2. Reply

    This is quite an informative update.
    Very interesting article

  3. Reply

    This is awesome

  4. Reply

    Tnks

  5. Reply

    Nice

  6. Reply

    Nice

  7. Reply

    This is really good and interesting to know

  8. Reply

    Good

  9. Reply

    Good

  10. Reply

    Fantastic update

  11. Reply

    Awesome

  12. Reply

    Good, lithium batteries have positive ions which move from the anode passes through the electrolyte until it gets to the cathode, it recombines with electrons to form a neutral charged ions

  13. Reply

    Interesting

  14. Reply

    Nice

  15. Reply

    Interesting

  16. Reply

    Good

  17. Reply

    Cul

  18. Reply

    This is impressive

  19. Reply

    Nice

  20. Reply

    Good

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