Author: Leonard Victor

Causes and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis

Causes and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by low bone mass and structural breakdown of bone, eventually causing bones to become fragile and increasing a person’s risk for fractures. Both men and women are affected by osteoporosis. The condition—which is both preventable and treatable—is more common in older adults, but it can affect anyone regardless of age, including children. In the Uni... »

Diagnosing and Treating Groin Pulls

Diagnosing and Treating Groin Pulls

A groin pull is an injury to the muscles (a muscle strain) of the inner thigh. The groin muscles, called the adductor muscle group, consists of six muscles that span the distance from the inner pelvis to the inner part of the femur (thigh bone). These muscles pull the legs together and help with other movements of the hip joint. The adductor muscles are important to many types of athletes includin... »

Causes and Treatment of Dupuytren’s Contracture

Causes and Treatment of Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren’s contracture is a condition that causes tightening, or contracture, of the palmar fascia, the connective tissue that lies beneath the skin in the palm of your hand. Because of the contracture, the fingers can become permanently bent down, and the function of your hand is impaired. The palmar fascia is a thick tissue that lies above the tendons and below the skin of the hand. The f... »

The Anatomy of the Otic Ganglion

The Anatomy of the Otic Ganglion

The otic ganglion is one of the four parasympathetic ganglia of the head. A collection of sensory neurons of the mandibular nerve, it works with the glossopharyngeal nerve and mandibular nerves to provide function to multiple salivary glands. It also has a motor function in chewing. Anatomy Ganglia are groups of nerves, typically with related functions, that meet up inside a capsule of connective ... »

The Anatomy of the Sphenoid Bone

The Anatomy of the Sphenoid Bone

An unpaired bone located in the cranium (or skull), the sphenoid bone, also known as the “wasp bone,” is located in the middle and towards the front of the skull, just in front of the occipital bone. The sphenoid bone is one of the seven bones that make up the orbit, the space that holds the eyeball, and helps make up the floor of the middle cranial fossa, the butterfly-shaped depression at the ba... »

What Is Small Cell Lung Cancer?

What Is Small Cell Lung Cancer?

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for approximately 15% of all lung cancers.1 It can cause symptoms ranging from fatigue to  and is more aggressive than the more common  Smoking is the leading and a biopsy is needed to confirm a diagnosis. While it may respond to radiation and chemotherapy initially, SCLC can spread quickly, often making surgery or a definitive cure less viable. Small Cell Lu... »

What Is Sleep Apnea?

What Is Sleep Apnea?

 is a common condition that affects millions of Americans. The chronic breathing disorder in which one repeatedly during the night may be due to a partial or complete obstruction (or collapse) of the typically affecting the base of the tongue and the soft palate.1 It also may occur due to a depressed signal from the brainstem to initiate a breath. These events last 10 seconds or longer, and may oc... »

What Are Shingles?

What Are Shingles?

  Shingles, also known as herpes zoster (HZ), is a painful and unsightly rash that’s caused by a reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), which is also responsible for Besides the vesicles and discomfort that are the main symptoms of shingles, many people go on to have persistent pain after the rash heals—a condition called ​ (PHN). Shingles can be treated with antiviral medica... »

What Is Scarlet Fever?

What Is Scarlet Fever?

Scarlet fever is an infection caused by group A streptococcus (group A strep), the same bacteria responsible for strep throat  Also known as scarlatina, it’s characterized by a rash and a red tongue. It’s most likely to strike children between ages 5 and 15 and rarely, if ever, affects adults. Although once a dangerous disease of childhood, scarlet fever is now highly treatable and unc... »

What Is Salmonella?

What Is Salmonella?

Salmonella is a type of bacteria that can produce a diarrheal illness called salmonellosis. Salmonella illness is typically caused by food contaminated with animal or human waste, or contact with animals that carry the bacteria. The illness usually runs its course in a few days with only supportive care needed. However, dehydration or invasive salmonella infection can be seen, especially in high-r... »

Things to Consider Before Hip Replacement Surgery

Things to Consider Before Hip Replacement Surgery

Hip replacement surgery is one of the most common joint replacement procedures, other than knee replacements.1 Many people have hip arthritis, but it can be difficult to know when the right time to have a hip replacement surgery is. Furthermore, there is confusion about what to expect from hip replacement surgery. Learn the basics you need to know about hip replacement surgery. Potential Risks of ... »

Causes of Groin Pain and Treatment Options

Causes of Groin Pain and Treatment Options

When people experience pain in their lower abdomen, where the leg meets the pelvis, they often refer to this as groin pain.1 While a muscle strain is the most common cause of groin pain in adults, a wide variety of other conditions may be to blame, including an inguinal hernia, kidney stone, or problems in or around the hip joint, in the scrotum (in men), or with specific nerves. Depending on the ... »

What Is Leukopenia?

What Is Leukopenia?

Leukopenia is the medical term that is used to describe a low white blood cell (leukocyte) count. Depending on the severity, leukopenia may increase the risk of infections, sometimes to a serious degree. There are many possible causes, including medications, infections, autoimmune conditions, cancer, vitamin deficiencies, and more. The evaluation begins with a complete blood count, but may include... »

What Is Myelofibrosis?

What Is Myelofibrosis?

Myelofibrosis, also known as agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, is an uncommon disease affecting the bone marrow which disrupts the body’s ability to produce health blood cells. Myelofibrosis causes the progressive scarring (fibrosis) of bone marrow, leading to abnormal blood cell counts and other serious complications. Some people with myelofibrosis may not have symptoms or require immediate tre... »

How Head Lice Is Treated

How Head Lice Is Treated

It can be distressing to discover head lice, but you can follow some simple steps to effectively treat the lice at home. Most infestations can be cleared up with over-the-counter anti-lice shampoos and wet-combing to check for lice and remove nits (lice eggs).1 Some prescription medications are available for resistant cases. If you want to avoid using chemicals, diligent wet-combing and nit-pickin... »

What Is Herpes?

What Is Herpes?

Herpes is a general term used to describe both oral herpes (also known as herpes labialis) and genital herpes. While these conditions may go by this same name in casual conversation and have some similarities, each is caused by a different type of the herpes simplex virus (HSV). HSV-1, or type 1 herpes, is most often responsible for herpes infections that result in lesions in or around the mouth, ... »

Coping and Living With HIV

Coping and Living With HIV

The prognosis for infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is no longer a death sentence in the United States. Most people who test positive for HIV in developed countries live long and healthy lives. This is thanks to highly effective antiretroviral medications that prevent the virus from destroying the immune system or even, in most cases, doing enough damage to allow for the developmen... »

How HIV Is Treated

How HIV Is Treated

People with HIV are living longer and healthier than they have at any other time, thanks to advances in medicine. But ultimately, the treatment of HIV is about more than that. It’s about understanding how the drugs work and identifying what you need to do as an individual to achieve the best positive results, whether you are newly infected or re-engaging with care. The Evolution of HIV Treat... »

How HIV Is Diagnosed

How HIV Is Diagnosed

An HIV test is used to determine if you have been infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). While the test is commonly performed on a blood or saliva sample, a newer urine-based test was approved for use in the United States in 2015. While both point-of-care and at-home testing options are extremely accurate if used correctly, they can return a false-negative result if you test too soo... »

What Is HIV/AIDS?

What Is HIV/AIDS?

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV is transmitted via blood, semen, and vaginal fluids and causes a range of symptoms that present soon after infection, including fever and mouth ulcers. After a latent period—during which HIV progresses to AIDS (HIV/AIDS), the virus’s third and final stage—those infected are faced with m... »

Inspiring and Comforting Quotes

Inspiring and Comforting Quotes

People can often find themselves tongue-tied if someone they care about is experiencing hardship or loss. If you are ever in this position and don’t know what to say, you can express your feelings by sharing quotations that reflect how you feel. In the end, if it strikes a chord with you, it will likely do the same to the loved one you are hoping to comfort. Sharing quotes—whether in a eulog... »

How Cancer Is Treated

How Cancer Is Treated

Treatment options for cancer depend on the specific type and stage of cancer and individual factors such as your age, possible side effects, and other conditions you may have. Local treatments include surgery and radiation therapy, targeting a specific tumor. Systemic treatments target cancer that has spread or may spread, and include chemotherapy, targeted therapies, hormonal therapies, and immun... »

How Cancer is Diagnosed

How Cancer is Diagnosed

There is no single definitive diagnostic test for cancer. Many tests and examinations are used to establish the diagnosis, as there are many kinds of cancer.1 The type of cancer, as well as the part(s) of the body it affects, will guide a doctor’s decisions about tests to order, as well as influence their choice of treatment. Taking a person’s medical history, performing a physical exa... »

Signs and Symptoms of Cancer

Signs and Symptoms of Cancer

Reviewing cancer symptoms can be surprising—and worrying. While there are several common symptoms of cancer, there are few that are specific to this group of diseases. Aside from those you may immediately associate with cancer (e.g., a breast lump or skin changes), symptoms such as, bloating, persistent cough, and others can also occur. Of course, these vague symptoms may also indicate something e... »

Chemotherapy for Cancer

Chemotherapy for Cancer

Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses medications to treat cancer. It may also be referred to as cytotoxic chemotherapy, as these drugs cause death to cancer cells. While an effective cancer treatment, it is a powerful one that can cause a host of side effects, from fatigue to hair loss. Though chemotherapy can still be challenging, management of many of these issues has improved dr... »

What Are Cataracts?

What Are Cataracts?

Cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss among people over age 55. They can make your vision appear fuzzy or blurry, as if you are looking through a fogged-up window. Cataracts can develop due to normal aging.1 Additionally, risk factors such as diabetes and smoking can also predispose you to cataracts. Treatment can range from wearing stronger eyeglasses to surgical removal of the cataract,... »

How Colon Cancer Is Treated

How Colon Cancer Is Treated

There are two main categories of treatments for colon cancer. Local treatments target one specific area, such as surgery or radiation. Systemic, or body-wide, treatments have a much wider net and include chemotherapy or targeted biologic therapies. Depending on your physical health, stage of cancer, and personal choice, you may elect one treatment or a combination. Early detection and treatment of... »

How Colon Cancer Is Diagnosed

How Colon Cancer Is Diagnosed

Screening for colon cancer, which is generally recommended for all people age 45 and older (and perhaps earlier, if someone is at increased risk), can indicate a problem, but it cannot officially diagnose the disease.1 Instead, a diagnostic (rather than a screening) colonoscopy, biopsy, and imaging tests are needed to confirm and define the extent of colon cancer. While many people start this proc... »

Causes and Risk Factors of Colon Cancer

Causes and Risk Factors of Colon Cancer

Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States in both men and women.1 Most cancers in the colon develop from polyps, which are growths that form within the inner lining of the colon. While most polyps do not actually turn into cancer, the ones that are most likely to are called adenomatous polyps or adenomas. Large polyps (greater than one centimeter), polyp... »

Symptoms of Colon Cancer

Symptoms of Colon Cancer

As the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, it’s important to know the symptoms of colon cancer so you can do your best to catch it early, when it’s most treatable. Some include cramping belly pain, dark or bright red blood in your stool, or a change in your stool frequency, like persistent diarrhea or constipation. Whole-body symptoms like unintentional w... »

What Is Colon Cancer?

What Is Colon Cancer?

Colon cancer begins when abnormal cells within the colon start growing uncontrollably. Symptoms may not occur initially, but as the disease progresses, a person may notice a change in their bowel habits or dark or bright red blood in their stools. There are several factors that increase a person’s chance of developing colon cancer, some within a person’s control (for example, being ove... »

What Is Meningitis?

What Is Meningitis?

Meningitis is inflammation of the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. It is typically caused by a viral (most common) or bacterial infection, the latter of which is significantly more serious and can be fatal if untreated. Meningitis causes a headache, fever, and stiff neck, among other symptoms.1 It may produce more serious complications, such as seizures or loss of consciousness. Ear... »

How Prostate Cancer Is Treated

How Prostate Cancer Is Treated

The treatment options for prostate cancer can vary based on many factors, including the aggressiveness of the tumor, the stage of the disease, personal preferences, and more. Curative options may include surgery or radiation therapy. With less aggressive tumors, watchful waiting (active surveillance) with treatment begun only if the cancer progresses may be an option. There are also a number of di... »

Causes and Risk Factors of Prostate Cancer

Causes and Risk Factors of Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer begins when a series of gene mutations in a prostate cell’s DNA cause the cell to grow and divide in an out-of-control fashion.1 The exact cause(s) have yet to be determined, but it’s thought that most prostate cancers develop due to a combination of factors that work together. Known risk factors for the disease include age, race, and geographical location. Researchers ... »

What Is Prostate Cancer?

What Is Prostate Cancer?

Prostate cancer is a slow-growing cancer of the prostate gland. Prostate cancer is actually a wide spectrum of diseases, with some tumors being aggressive and others that act more benign. What causes it is uncertain, though there are known risk factors, such as age. Urination issues are symptoms most associated with the disease, though most cases are first suspected because of screening tests, suc... »

How Oral Cancer Is Treated

How Oral Cancer Is Treated

The best treatment options for oral cancer depend on many factors, including the location of the tumor, the stage of the disease, and general health. Unlike many cancers, the mainstay of therapy can be surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, and both chemotherapy and radiation may be used with a curative approach. When surgery is used, it is not always the first step. Chemotherapy (with radia... »

What Is Oral Cancer?

What Is Oral Cancer?

Oral cancer is a type of  that develops when abnormal cells within the lining of the cheeks, gums, roof of the mouth, tongue, or lips grow uncontrollably. Often times, oropharyngeal cancer—that affects the soft palate, side and back walls of the throat, back third of the tongue, and —is lumped under this term, too. Tobacco and alcohol use are the major risk factors for the disease, but there are o... »

How Epilepsy Is Diagnosed

How Epilepsy Is Diagnosed

In order to diagnose your doctor will need to verify that you’ve had two or more unprovoked  and then figure out what type of seizures they were. This can involve a neurological exam and a variety of tests, the most common of which is an electroencephalogram (EEG). Other tests may include blood tests, a computerized tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and a positron emiss... »

What Is Epilepsy?

What Is Epilepsy?

Epilepsy is a neurological condition that’s caused by electrical disturbances in the brain that result in seizures, which can cause unusual behavior, movements, or experiences, and sometimes a lack of awareness or loss of consciousness. Epilepsy is diagnosed when you’ve had two or more seizures and there’s no medical condition behind them, such as alcohol withdrawal or low blood ... »

An Overview of Dry Eye Syndrome

An Overview of Dry Eye Syndrome

Dry eye syndrome, also called keratitis sicca, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, or xerophthalmia is a recurrent or persistent sensation of dryness of the eyes. The condition is uncomfortable and it can interfere with your quality of life. You may have trouble keeping your eyes open or you may not be able to work or drive due to severe dryness of your eyes. Dry eye disease can vary from mild to extremel... »

What to Eat After Surgery and What to Avoid

What to Eat After Surgery and What to Avoid

If you have had surgery, the food you eat can make a great impact on your recovery and on how quickly your wound heals. Eating the right foods can prevent complications, such as constipation and high blood glucose, and provide the necessary building blocks of protein your skin needs to heal quickly. 1 Reassess Your Typical Diet Sarah Remington / Stocksy United One of the best things you can do to ... »

What Is an Upper Respiratory Infection?

What Is an Upper Respiratory Infection?

Many people consider an upper respiratory infection (URI) and a common cold to be the same condition. This is not entirely true, however, since a cold virus is only one of many infectious agents that can cause an upper respiratory infection. It is more accurate to describe an upper respiratory infection as any type of infection that affects the upper respiratory tract, namely the nose, sinuses, an... »

The Anatomy of the Penis

The Anatomy of the Penis

The human penis has a reproductive function and urinary function. It contains the urethra, which allows for the passage of urine. It also has erectile and ejaculatory functions which make it possible for males to engage in sexual intercourse. The penis consists of a number of parts of which the most obvious externally are the shaft, the glans (head), and the foreskin. Removal of the foreskin for r... »

What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

Pancreatic cancer is uncommon, but since the majority of these cancers are in the advanced stages at the time of diagnosis, it is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States.1 The American Gastroenterological Association recommends that patients who are deemed to be “high risk,” including those with a first-degree family history of the disease and certain gene... »

The 10 Most Common Plastic Surgery Procedures

The 10 Most Common Plastic Surgery Procedures

Plastic surgery is growing in popularity each year, with almost 18 million surgical procedures taking place in the United States annually.1 Women are no longer the only people having cosmetic surgery. Men are contributing to the boom in procedures. 1. Liposuction There are two types of liposuction, a surgical procedure that suctions fat from specific areas of the body to provide a slimmer and shap... »

What Is Erectile Dysfunction?

What Is Erectile Dysfunction?

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to get an erection or to keep one that’s firm enough or that lasts long enough for a man to have a satisfying sexual experience. Occasional bouts of ED aren’t unusual. In fact, 43 percent of US men have erectile difficulties.1 Symptoms, of course, are rather obvious. And while age can be a risk factor, so can medication use, health conditions,... »

Common Conditions That Can Affect the Uterus

Common Conditions That Can Affect the Uterus

A number of medical conditions can affect a woman’s uterus(womb) and cause pain, such as polyps, endometriosis, fibroids, and cancer. Uterine pain or discomfort is usually felt in the pelvic and lower abdominal region, and it often spreads to the mid-abdomen or lower back. Accompanying symptoms of different uterine conditions are similar and may include irregular menstrual bleeding and diffi... »

Facts About Vaccines, Vaccine Ingredients, and Vaccine Safety

Facts About Vaccines, Vaccine Ingredients, and Vaccine Safety

Making informed choices about the health and the health of your family can be difficult, especially when there is a lot of misinformation out there. Social media sites and websites are full designed to mislead parents or scare them away from vaccinating their children. But vaccinating is one of the most important steps families can take not only to protect themselves from diseases like measles or ... »

What Is Cardiac Ablation?

What Is Cardiac Ablation?

Cardiac ablation is a specialized cardiac catheterization procedure used to treat various cardiac arrhythmias, when those arrhythmias cannot be managed adequately with drug therapy or other forms of treatment. During cardiac ablation procedures, careful computerized mapping is done of the heart’s electrical system to identify specific areas that are responsible for the arrhythmia. Once the target ... »

What Is the Connection Between Chronic Illness and Depression?

What Is the Connection Between Chronic Illness and Depression?

Many people with chronic illness will experience depression. In fact, depression is one of the most common complications reported by people with chronic illnesses. According to the Cleveland Clinic, up to one-third of people living with a serious chronic disease will experience symptoms of depression.1 It’s not difficult to see how the stresses of a chronic disease can trigger feelings of despair ... »

What Is Insomnia?

What Is Insomnia?

Insomnia is characterized by an inability to obtain a sufficient amount of sleep to feel rested. It can be due to either difficulty falling or staying asleep. It may also result in waking earlier than desired. The sleep is often reported to be of chronically poor quality, light, and unrefreshing. As a result of this, people with insomnia suffer from daytime symptoms like poor attention, irritabili... »

How Immunotherapy Works for Cancer Treatment

How Immunotherapy Works for Cancer Treatment

Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses your immune system to fight malignant cells. The term immunotherapy is actually used broadly for a collection of varying treatment strategies that alter the body’s immune response or use substances made by the immune system to target cancer cells. These treatments are known as biologic therapies. How Immunotherapy Works The theory behind immunoth... »

An Overview of Childhood Obesity

An Overview of Childhood Obesity

Childhood obesity has been on the rise in the United States for over a decade, and, according to the American Heart Association (AHA), approximately one in three children and teenagers is obese or overweight. As the AHA notes, this rate is nearly triple what it was in 1963. In fact, childhood obesity has become so alarmingly prevalent and such a threat to children’s health that the American Academ... »

What Is Chronic Pain?

What Is Chronic Pain?

Pain is one of the most common complaints people go to the doctor with. In the U.S. alone, more than 100 million people are estimated to live with chronic pain. Chronic pain is very different from acute pain. Acute pain is what you experience when you get hurt—say, when you break a bone or burn your hand—or when something goes wrong in your body, such as appendicitis, or a passing kidney stone.1 A... »

What Is Inflammation of the Lungs?

What Is Inflammation of the Lungs?

Lung inflammation can be acute or chronic, and there are many possible causes, including exposures, infections, and diseases like asthma or bronchitis. Because inflammation of the lungs can affect their functioning, it can cause wheezing, difficulty breathing, or chest pain and tightness. The diagnosis of lung inflammation involves a multifaceted approach, incorporating a physical examination, ima... »

Causes and Risk Factors of Celiac Disease

Causes and Risk Factors of Celiac Disease

It’s not entirely clear what causes celiac disease. In fact, most researchers believe multiple factors are involved, including your genes, your environment, and the foods you eat. You need some or even all of these factors to be present in order to develop celiac disease.1 Common Causes Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease in which gluten in your diet triggers your white blood cells to at... »

Do Some People Get Chickenpox Twice?

Do Some People Get Chickenpox Twice?

Children typically build up a lifelong immunity to chickenpox (varicella) after getting an infection and don’t get it again.1 But parents may still wonder whether their child might get this infection twice, and whether vaccination is recommended after a child has a case of varicella. Getting Chickenpox Twice There are some situations in which a child might get chickenpox more than once, inc... »

Causes and Risk Factors of Chickenpox

Causes and Risk Factors of Chickenpox

Chickenpox is a viral infection, which simply means that it’s caused by a specific virus that spreads easily from person to person. Thanks to a highly effective vaccine for preventing chickenpox, the illness has become increasingly less common in the United States and other developed countries. People young and old do still get sick with chickenpox, however, and for some of them, the infecti... »

How Chickenpox Is Diagnosed

How Chickenpox Is Diagnosed

Chickenpox is typically easy to diagnose by a physician through a simple examination of the rash. If there’s any uncertainty, it can be confirmed with lab testing. chickenpox diagnosis © Verywell, 2018 Self-Checks/At-Home Testing Just a few decades ago, the chickenpox was an incredibly common illness. Nearly everyone came down with it at some point during childhood. Because it was so common,... »

What Is Chickenpox?

What Is Chickenpox?

Chickenpox is a highly contagious infection characterized by an itchy rash made up of red, fluid-filled blisters (pox) and flu-like symptoms. Both the rash and the other symptoms usually can be effectively treated with over-the-counter medication and home remedies, though an antiviral drug may be prescribed. Once regarded as an inevitable disease of childhood, chickenpox has become less common sin... »

What is Psoriasis?

What is Psoriasis?

Is an autoimmune disorder that causes healthy skin cells to turn over at an abnormally fast rate. This leads to cell buildup and flaking cells on the outermost layer of the skin that are seen as rashes or lesions. These patches can appear on virtually any part of the body. Psoriasis can run in families, but is not contagious. The most common type is plaque psoriasis, but there are several others t... »

Causes and Risk Factors of COPD

Causes and Risk Factors of COPD

(COPD) is primarily caused by long-term, cumulative exposure to airway irritants such as cigarette smoke and pollution, though it can also result from and other respiratory illnesses.1 Recurrent inflammation caused by these health issues changes the lungs, progressing over time and hampering breathing. Knowing the causes and risk factors of COPD can help you better understand the extent of your ri... »

Symptoms of Thyroid Disease in Children

Symptoms of Thyroid Disease in Children

While thyroid disease most often develops during adulthood, it can occur in infants, children, and teenagers as well. The symptoms of thyroid disease in children may be hard to recognize because many—changes in appetite, sleep patterns, emotions, and energy levels—are all also experienced as part of normal development during these Verywell / JR Bee Thyroid Disease in Children Thyroid disease durin... »

How Bronchiectasis Is Treated

How Bronchiectasis Is Treated

treatment is to control lung infections, promote the drainage of excessive secretions, and prevent complications. This may involve antibiotics, expectorants, and several different techniques and procedures. The multi-strategy/multi-goal approach to treating this form of obstructive lung disease is due to its repetitive cycle, in which the airways abnormally widen, causing inflammation and the pool... »

CAUSE OF MEMORY LOSS

CAUSE OF MEMORY LOSS

The hippocampus plays a critical role in the formation, organization, and storage of new memories as well as connecting certain sensations and emotions to these memories. Have you ever noticed how a particular scent might trigger a strong memory? It is the hippocampus that plays a role in this connection. What Is the Hippocampus? The hippocampus is a small, curved formation in the brain that plays... »

How to Use an EpiPen

How to Use an EpiPen

With food allergies so common in children today, many doctors recommend parents carry automatic epinephrine injectors that can be used if their child has an anaphylactic reaction. Similarly, allergists recommend that adults with severe allergies also carry epinephrine injectors at all times. What Is Anaphylaxis? Anaphylaxis is a severe allergy that can affect as much as 15% of the population. If t... »

How to Avoid Lightning Strikes

How to Avoid Lightning Strikes

According to the National Weather Service (NWS), over the last 30 years (from 1989 to 2018), lightning killed an average of 43 people per year, more than either tornadoes or hurricanes for the same time period. Only floods were responsible for more deaths in that time.1 Lightning Facts from the NWS: Over 21 million cloud-to-ground lightning strikes occur in the United States each year Lightning ca... »

How to Survive Flash Floods in Your Car

How to Survive Flash Floods in Your Car

Almost half of all flash floohappen in vehicles.1 Moving wter is very easy to underestimate. Driving through any sort of moving water can sweep your car right off the road, even in seemingly mild flooding as shallow as a few inches. Flooding can hide some monster hazards. Remember, the water is always the same on top. It’s what’s underneath that you can’t predict. In any disaster... »

Packing a Disaster Evacuation Kit

Packing a Disaster Evacuation Kit

The type of disaster kit you should make depends on your needs. If you’re in an area where you are likely to evacuate in the event of a disaster, pack your portable kit in road-friendly boxes. If you’re likely to be stuck at home without water or power, storing a “kit” really just means dedicating a few shelves to disaster supplies. Of course, even if you expect to stay hom... »

Signs and and symptoms of bed bug bites

Signs and and symptoms of bed bug bites

A bedbug bite is similar to bites from other species of bugs. There is little that differentiates the actual bite mark. Because of this, bedbug bites are often misdiagnosed as either coming from other species or as being skin rashes unrelated to bug bites at all.1 © Verywell, 2018 Common Symptoms Itching Bedbugs have needle-like mouthparts that pierce the skin and allow the bedbugs to feast on blo... »