Day: June 20, 2020

Chasing paradise: five alternatives to Boracay

Chasing paradise: five alternatives to Boracay

The Philippines’ famed island, Boracay, was closed to the public in April 2018 in an attempt to try and restore the incredible location to its former glory after suffering the effects of overtourism. The picturesque island, previously famous for pristine beaches and a heady party vibe, has reopened with a limit on the daily number of visitors and a set of rules designed to protect the enviro... »

Castles, cliff-tops and caves: exploring the white towns of Cádiz

Castles, cliff-tops and caves: exploring the white towns of Cádiz

Centuries-old castles, rust-red-roofed homes, white-walled alleys, soul-stirring strategic cliff-top sites and an enthrallingly volatile history: Cádiz’ pueblos blancos (white towns) are a joy to unravel. The finest can be perfectly strung together on a multi-day drive. Andalucía bursts with beautifully blanched villages – originally (unromantically) whitewashed in the 19th century to deflect the ... »

Getting the best out of your trip to Bhutan

Getting the best out of your trip to Bhutan

Mention Bhutan to savvy travellers and you normally get two reactions. First comes a wistful ‘aaahh’, as people summon up hazy images of a pristine Himalayan kingdom, of colourful Buddhist festivals and a traditional culture that seems lost in an earlier age. This is swiftly followed by a tear in the eye, as people remember that Bhutan is closed off to casual visitors and way beyond the average tr... »

Medieval and contemporary: unlocking the secrets of Córdoba

Medieval and contemporary: unlocking the secrets of Córdoba

It doesn’t get as much hype as fabled Granada or scintillating Seville, but there’s another city right in the middle of Andalucía that no one should miss. Famed above all for its wonderful Mezquita (mosque), one of the great works of Islamic architecture, Córdoba is a beguiling place that oozes history in every twisting lane and flower-filled patio of its old centre. It is also well in... »

Six can’t-miss winter activities in New Zealand

Six can’t-miss winter activities in New Zealand

Most visitors to New Zealand schedule their trip during the nation’s balmy summer months, but wintertime heralds a whole new set of attractions across both islands, from world-class skiing to bubbling hot springs, next-level wildlife watching to quirky winter festivals. With fewer crowds and prices for rental cars and accommodation typically slashed, it’s a wonderful time to rug up and explore thi... »

Federal Government moves to curtail rejection of agro exports

Federal Government moves to curtail rejection of agro exports

Piqued by the rising poor food safety practices and standards that led to huge economic losses evident in the myriad of rejects of some food exports at the international markets, the Nigerian National Accreditation Systems (NiNAS), said it is driving performance in the food supply chain to reduce the incidence. They also declared a readiness to support Nigeria to achieve food safety amid the COVID... »

Manufacturing sector’s performance remains weak despite ‘interventions

Manufacturing sector’s performance remains weak despite ‘interventions

Despite interventions by the government, especially in the areas of ease of doing business in the country, local manufacturing remains challenged and overwhelmed by weak and frail performance outlook. In their assessment of activities in the real sector, both the Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN), and the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI) called for urgent government intervent... »

Adventures in Northern Patagonia: exploring Chile’s verdant peaks and valleys

Adventures in Northern Patagonia: exploring Chile’s verdant peaks and valleys

There are few places left in the world as wild and unruffled by the hands of man as Patagonia. The little-visited northern half of Chilean Patagonia is a markedly different world where fairytale rainforests, puffing volcanoes, raging rivers and sharply hewn fjords all compete for attention. Ripe for exploration, here are seven of the most epic outdoor adventures you won’t want to miss. The salty s... »

Seoul traders: fall head over heels for South Korea’s crazy sock scene

Seoul traders: fall head over heels for South Korea’s crazy sock scene

Barack Obama socks? Korean boy-band socks? Instant ramen socks? Matching socks for couples? Socks for pets? If you can imagine it, you can find socks in Seoul to match. Socks are fun and affordable and make perfect souvenirs to warm your toes or to bring home to friends. Several racks of socks in a variety of colours and patterns In Seoul, crazy socks come in all colours and stripes © Megan Eaves ... »

Nigerian seafarers bemoan disdain for local certificates

Nigerian seafarers bemoan disdain for local certificates

Notwithstanding the massive investment in seafarers’ development by the Federal Government, the Nigerian crew is still facing severe discrimination due to preference for foreign certificates. The Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA), had invested heavily in its National Seafarers Development Programme, (NSDP) scheme, but has been experiencing a delay in taking the cadets for... »

Lego, Vikings & an underground bunker: family heaven around Billund, Denmark

Lego, Vikings & an underground bunker: family heaven around Billund, Denmark

Denmark: so child-friendly it even has a ‘Capital of Children’. This kid-friendly utopia is centred on Billund, the heartland of Lego, but around it there are plenty of other attractions too, including a Viking town, Scandinavia’s best waterpark, and the fantastic Givskud Zoo. Adults and children playing with brightly-coloured Lego bricks inside the Lego House in Billund © Abigail Blasi / Lonely P... »

Greener Paris: how eco initiatives are changing the French capital

Greener Paris: how eco initiatives are changing the French capital

Ambitious environmental initiatives are making the French capital cleaner and greener than ever. Visitors to Paris today will encounter riverbank parks reclaimed from expressways, new gardens, vegetated rooftops and living walls, fewer cars, more cycling paths, eco-friendly public transport, renewable energies – including sleek, silent Eiffel Tower wind turbines partially powering its operations –... »

Ogun state decry high rate of pregnancy among youths

Ogun state decry high rate of pregnancy among youths

  Ogun State government yesterday decried the increasing rate of teenage pregnancy among school girls following the shutdown of schools as a result of the outbreak of coronavirus. The state’s Commissioner for Health, Dr. Tomi Coker, who disclosed this while speaking with journalists in Abeokuta, the state capital, urged parents to encourage their children to visit the teenage units of primary... »

Whitby – how a Yorkshire seaside town became the UK’s gothic capital

Whitby – how a Yorkshire seaside town became the UK’s gothic capital

Dracula’s arrival in England, Bram Stoker’s classic 1897 novel established this pretty Yorkshire seaside town’s reputation as a gothic icon. Whalebone arch, Whitby The whalebone arch recalls Whitby’s maritime past – and gave Bram Stoker a perfect view of the abbey © Lorna Parkes / Lonely Planet Today, still loomed over by the spectral ruins of the medieval abbey that inspired Stoker, Whitby ... »

How moves by APC elders to reconcile Obaseki, Oshiomhole failed

How moves by APC elders to reconcile Obaseki, Oshiomhole failed

Former Minister of Information and Culture, Prince Tony Momoh, in this interview, discloses in detail how steps were taken by elders of the party to reconcile Edo State Governor, Godwin Obaseki, with his estranged godfather and National Chairman of the party, Adams Oshiomhole, failed to bear fruit. A founding father of the party, he predicts that the September 19 governorship election in Edo would... »

Leader of Africa’s first Economic War reveals why Africans are poor

Leader of Africa’s first Economic War reveals why Africans are poor

Why are Africans poor? Now here’s a question that demands an answer. Why is it that arguably the world’s richest continent – in terms of natural resources – has some of the world’s poorest people? Already I can sense you rolling your eyes deep into the back of your head. “the government, yes the government …”     We often seem to be a people who blame the government for everything happen... »

From Bedtime Stories to Bilingual Tales: Our Best Baby Book Picks

From Bedtime Stories to Bilingual Tales: Our Best Baby Book Picks

There’s something inherently precious about reading to children — especially when they’re babies. Watching their eyes intently study each page as you read is a heartwarming experience, and it feels good to know you’re encouraging a present — and future — love of books.   But there are a lot of choices out there. So, if this is your first time at the parenting rodeo or you’re shopping for a fr... »

Exercises You Can Do Right After Having a Baby (It’s Not What You Think!)

Exercises You Can Do Right After Having a Baby (It’s Not What You Think!)

We’re not giving you the green light to train for a marathon just yet, but these moves will help you strengthen your pelvic floor so you can get back to a routine.   Congratulations! You did it. You made a human. Pretty impressive stuff.   You may be thinking it’s time to get back to your normal workout routine. Great! That enthusiasm will help you get moving and doing all the right stuf... »

Boiled Egg Diet Review: Does It Work for Weight Loss?

Boiled Egg Diet Review: Does It Work for Weight Loss?

The Boiled Egg Diet is a popular fad diet that promises fast weight loss. As its name implies, the diet involves eating several servings of hard-boiled eggs per day, along with other lean proteins, non-starchy vegetables, and low carb fruits. While some appreciate the structured style of the plan and claim that it can jump-start weight loss, it has also been criticized for being highly restrictive... »

What do you know a about Melanoma

What do you know a about Melanoma

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer. It is not the most common, but it is the most serious, as it often spreads. When this happens, it can be difficult to treat, and the outlook may be poor. Risk factors for melanoma include overexposure to the sun, having fair skin, and a family history of melanoma, among others. Receiving an early diagnosis and getting prompt treatment can improve the outlook for ... »

Future of iPhone 8

Future of iPhone 8

4.7-inch IPS Touch Display, 750 x 1334 pixels (326 ppi) Apple A10 Fusion Chipset with 2GB RAM iOS 10 Water Resistant & Dustproof 32GB, 128GB, or 256GB Built-in Storage 12MP Rear Camera and 7MP Front Camera 4G LTE (up to 450 Mbps download) Fingerprint Sensor (Front) 1960 mAh Li-ion Battery Design iPhone 7 comes with a similar design as the iPhone 6S. The size is about the same. However, like we... »

The History of Chinese architecture

The History of Chinese architecture

From the circular houses built with mud and wood in the Neolithic period to grand palaces with exquisite roofs to the skyscrapers of today, Chinese architecture has evolved over a long period of time. Below is the historical development of Chinese architecture in different periods. Neolithic Period (Pre-1600 BC) The Neolithic village of Banpo provides examples of the early architecture in Northern... »

9 aspects of Chinese ancient culture

9 aspects of Chinese ancient culture

Ancient Chinese culture from about 3,600–2,200 years ago underpins modern Chinese culture in everything from traditions to religion to writing: see how. 1. Pictographic Characters for Writing Archaeological discoveries show that by 1200, the Shang were writing in pictograms that were somewhat similar to the characters used today in Chinese writing. Scholars have discovered that some characters suc... »

Ancient Chinese culture

Ancient Chinese culture

Ancient Chinese culture, before the imperial era (from 221 BC), has obscure beginnings. Later invasions and contact with foreign cultures has colored Chinese culture, but the underlying forms established during the Shang and Zhou eras still appear in modern Chinese culture in everything from religion, to traditions, to dress, to writing in characters. The Shang people (c.1600–1046 BC) developed cu... »